Tag Archives: Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security

Taking Stock of Missouri Food Pantries

Taking Stock, a series of regional reports published by Grow Well Missouri and the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security, provides analysis and discussion to better understand the ways in which the management and operations of food pantries can be enhanced. Based on a survey of 204 food pantry directors, the reports highlight some of the unique needs of food pantries in the areas of planning, communications, facilities, operations, and others. The reports also shed light on areas where food pantries excel.

Visit the Taking Stock webpage to find reports from the Harvesters-Community Food Network region (Kansas City metro), the Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri region, the Southeast Missouri Food Bank region, and the Ozarks Food Harvest region (Southwest Missouri).

Plant Gardens. Grow Food. Share the Harvest.

plant grow and share logo4_color_plain_edited-1

Plant, Grow & Share is a project of Grow Well Missouri and the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security. The goal is simple – to encourage donations of fresh, garden-grown produce to hunger relief groups. We believe that good food should be on the tables of everyone in our state. Please join us!

How does it work?

Gardeners, community garden groups, and farmers can find a hunger relief group in their community by visiting the Feeding Missouri Agency Finder web page. Enter your zip code in the address section, select how far you are willing to travel, and click Find Locations. 

Consider the options provided and make a phone call to determine whether a group can accept donations of fresh produce. Confirm the quantity of produce they can handle, their address, and the hours they accept donations.

When it comes time to donate, harvest and handle the produce with care. We have provided tips for ensuring that produce remains fresh and safe for recipients.

Tell your friends. We can make a bigger difference if we all pitch in.

facebook iconFollow Plant, Grow & Share on Facebook.

Why is this important?

Missouri has the second highest rate of hunger (7.9%) after Arkansas. Over the past 10 years, the percentage of Missourians who experience hunger increased by 103% (USDA).

Resources

Donating Produce from Farms and Gardens – for tips on how food pantries and growers can work together to increase produce donations.
Safely Harvesting and Handling Produce – for tips on using safe harvesting and handling practices when making donations of fresh produce to a food pantry.
Planting Calendar – North Missouri
Planting Calendar – Central Missouri
Planting Calendar – Ozarks (Missouri)
Planting Calendar – Southwest Missouri
Planting Calendar – South Central Missouri

Please contact Bill McKelvey at McKelveyWA [at] missouri [dot] edu for more information.

Healthy Shelves Hits the Shelves

Healthy Shelves Cover

A new publication by the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security, Healthy Shelves: Promoting and enhancing good nutrition in food pantries, was released in January 2015. This 24 page booklet offers tips and strategies for linking food pantries and community partners to get healthier food onto the shelves of pantries and into the homes of food pantry customers. With strategies based on more than two years of field work, the guide highlights nutrition improvement activities in the areas of Food Availability and Access, Food Consumption, Food Pantry Capacity and Development, and Food Acquisition and Distribution. Personal stories highlight the innovative work of pantry directors and partners committed to improving community health.

The complete booklet including supplemental materials can be downloaded from the Healthy Shelves home page. For more information, contact Bill McKelvey at McKelveyWA@missouri.edu.

Healthy Shelves

Promoting and Enhancing Good Nutrition in Food Pantries

Healthy Shelves Cover Publication (PDF)

This new publication from the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security dives into the topic of food pantry nutrition. Based on more than two years of working closely with food pantries in central Missouri, the guide offers a number of creative and promising approaches to getting healthier foods in to food pantries and on the tables of food pantry customers.

The resource highlights nutrition improvement strategies in four different areas – Food Availability and Access, Food Consumption, Food Pantry Capacity and Development, and Food Acquisition and Distribution. It also spotlights the work of people and organizations making it happen.

Healthy Shelves can be downloaded here.

Additional resources that accompany the guide can be found at the links below:

Contact Bill McKelvey, McKelveyWA@missouri.edu, for more information.

This project is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Grant No. 2010-85216-20645 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Human Nutrition and Obesity Program – 93330.

New Report Reviews Healthy Food Access Research

policy link food trust logos

Policy Link and The Food Trust recently released a joint report titled Access to Healthy Food and Why it Matters: A Review of the Research. Drawing on more than 300 studies published between 1990 and 2013, the report highlights the importance of improving access to healthy food for those living in low-income neighborhoods, communities of color, and rural areas. In addition to showing that better eating habits and decreased risk of diet-related diseases are associated with living closer to retail outlets that carry healthy foods, the report provides evidence for the positive economic impact of healthy food retailing and an analysis of policy and research implications.

Food Bank Conference Brings Allies Together

hunger gap conf logoLooking for ways to engage food banks and anti-hunger allies in a meaningful dialogue about long-term solutions to hunger, the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona hosted the inaugural Closing the Hunger Gap conference in Tucson in 2013. Sessions featured innovative organizations that incorporate nutrition education, community organizing, policy, economic development, and local food production into their work. Discussions centered on the root causes of hunger and tangible ways food banks can work together to address the most pressing issues and needs of their clients. The conference concluded with an action planning session to build momentum for ongoing work and collaboration among attendees.

To keep posted or become involved, check out the conference materials and updates on the Closing the Hunger Gap website and Facebook page. The next conference will be held in Tacoma, WA, September 11-13, 2017.

New Missouri Hunger Atlas Raises Awareness of Extent, Depth of Hunger in Missouri

The Missouri Hunger Atlas 2013, recently released by the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security, provides a county-by-county assessment of the extent of food insecurity in the state. The Atlas also measures the work of a host of public and private programs intended to help people struggling with hunger.

First issued in 2008, the Missouri Hunger Atlas is now in it’s third edition and features updated county tables and rankings, indicator maps, and trend analyses. A new feature of the 2013 edition is a Food Affordability measure. This measure estimates the percent of income required each week by households to meet average food expenditures in a given county.

The 2013 Atlas is available in whole or part and is easy to use and access by visiting the Missouri Hunger Atlas 2013 webpage.

Missouri Hunger Atlas

New 2016 Edition Now Available

The Missouri Hunger Atlas – now in its 4th edition – visually engages readers to better understand hunger in Missouri. Through a series of indicator maps and tables, the Atlas details the extent of food insecurity in all 114 Missouri counties and the city of St. Louis. The Atlas also assesses the performance of a host of public and private programs intended to help people struggling with hunger.

Key features of the Missouri Hunger Atlas

  • County Tables for each county in Missouri (including the city of St. Louis) that measure rates of both food insecurity and program performance.
  • State Maps that graphically illustrate patterns of food insecurity and program performance across the state.
  • County Rankings, Comparisons, and Trends which rank counties based on need and performance measures, compare  county measures with state averages, and indicate the trend for particular measures over time.

Download the Atlas

The Missouri Hunger Atlas 2016 may be downloaded in whole or part for free.

Full Report with County Profiles

Report Introduction (without County Profiles) – includes background information, descriptions of indicators, state maps for many important indicators, county comparisons, and concluding remarks

Individual county profiles may be accessed by clicking on the county name included on the map or list below.

 

Adair County
Andrew County
Atchison County
Audrain County
Barry County
Barton County
Bates County
Benton County
Bollinger County
Boone County
Buchanan County
Butler County
Caldwell County
Callaway County
Camden County
Cape Girardeau County
Carroll County
Carter County
Cass County
Cedar County
Chariton County
Christian County
Clark County
Clay County
Clinton County
Cole County
Cooper County
Crawford County
Dade County
Dallas County
Daviess County
DeKalb County
Dent County
Douglas County
Dunklin County
Franklin County
Gasconade County
Gentry County
Greene County
Grundy County
Harrison County
Henry County
Hickory County
Holt County
Howard County
Howell County
Iron County
Jackson County
Jasper County
Jefferson County
Johnson County
Knox County
Laclede County
Lafayette County
Lawrence County
Lewis County
Lincoln County
Linn County
Livingston County
McDonald County
Macon County
Madison County
Maries County
Marion County
Mercer County
Miller County
Mississippi County
Moniteau County
Monroe County
Montgomery County
Morgan County
New Madrid County
Newton County
Nodaway County
Oregon County
Osage County
Ozark County
Pemiscot County
Perry County
Pettis County
Phelps County
Pike County
Platte County
Polk County
Pulaski County
Putnam County
Ralls County
Randolph County
Ray County
Reynolds County
Ripley County
St. Charles County
St. Clair County
St. Francois County
Ste. Genevieve County
St. Louis County
Saline County
Schuyler County
Scotland County
Scott County
Shannon County
Shelby County
Stoddard County
Stone County
Sullivan County
Taney County
Texas County
Vernon County
Warren County
Washington County
Wayne County
Webster County
Worth County
Wright County
St. Louis City

The Missouri Hunger Atlas 2016 is a publication of the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security at the University of Missouri. Authors include Anne Cafer, Darren Chapman, Kathlee Freeman, and Sandy Rikoon. For more information contact Dr. Sandy Rikoon, RikoonSandy@missouri.edu, 573-882-0861.

Previous Editions of the Missouri Hunger Atlas

Missouri Hunger Atlas 2013 PDF
Missouri Hunger Atlas 2010 PDF
Kansas City Hunger Atlas 2010 PDF
Saint Louis Hunger Atlas 2010 PDF
Missouri Hunger Atlas 2008 PDF

Related

A Hungrier Missouri: Hunger Atlas shows food insecurity continues to worsen (CAFNR News, 2013)
Food Insecurity Continues to Grow, MU Researchers Find (MU News Bureau, 2013)
Missouri’s hunger rates on the rise, atlas provides comprehensive data on the problem (KBIA, 2013)

Food Assistance and the Farm Bill Debate

Capitol_Building_Full_View

Amidst the current Farm Bill debate, University of Arkansas Law professor Susan Schneider offers a reasoned assessment of who benefits from federal nutrition programs, the efficiency in which the programs are implemented, and the economic impact of spending food stamp dollars in local communities.

The article is featured in the Agricultural Law Blog, the official blog of the Association of American Law Schools section on agricultural and food law.

Food Assistance and the Farm Bill Debate

Capitol_Building_Full_View

Amidst the current Farm Bill debate, University of Arkansas Law Professor Susan Schneider offers a reasoned assessment of who benefits from federal nutrition assistance programs, the efficiency in which the programs are administered, and the economic impact of spending food stamp dollars in local communities.

The article appears in the Agricultural Law Blog, the official blog of the Association of American Law Schools section on agricultural and food law.